Echo Trivia

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Leonardo da Vinci

was the first person to draw an Atrial Septal Defect in the year 1513 AD

Leonardo Da Vinci (April 15, 1452 - May 2, 1519) was an Italian polymath. He has often been described as the archetype of the ‘Renaissance Man’, a man of "unquenchable curiosity" and "feverishly inventive imagination". He is widely considered to be one of the greatest painter of all time and perhaps the most diversely talented person ever to have lived.

Leonardo's anatomical drawings include many studies of the human skeleton and its parts, and of muscles and sinews. He studied the mechanical functions of the skeleton and the muscular forces that are applied to it in a manner that prefigured the modern science of biomechanics. He drew the heart and vascular system, the sex organs and other internal organs, making one of the first scientific drawings of a fetus in utero.

Leonardo da Vinci wrote, “I have found from left auricle to right auricle the perforating channel.” Leonardo’s account of a true atrial septal defect is thought to be the first record of a congenital malformation of the human heart in 1513 AD.

Leonardo's dissections and documentation of muscles, nerves, and vessels helped to describe the physiology and mechanics of movement. He attempted to identify the source of 'emotions' and their expression. He was the first to define atherosclerosis and liver cirrhosis. He created models of the cerebral ventricles with the use of melted wax.

Leonardo da Vinci constructed a glass aorta to observe the circulation of blood through the aortic valve by using water and grass seed to watch flow patterns.

Source: wikipedia.org

Did you know....

Daniel Bernoulli

Daniel Bernoulli was a Swiss national of Dutch origin. He was born on 8th February 1700 in Groningen, in the Netherlands, into a family of distinguished mathematicians. He was a mathematician and physicist and was one of the many prominent mathematicians in the Bernoulli family. He is particularly remembered for his applications of mathematics to mechanics, especially fluid mechanics, and for his pioneering work in probability and statistics. His name is commemorated in the Bernoulli's principle, a particular example of the conservation of energy, which describes the mathematics of the mechanism underlying the operation of two important technologies of the 20th century: the carburetor and the airplane wing.

Daniel was the son of Johann Bernoulli (one of the "early developers" of calculus) and a nephew of Jacob Bernoulli (who "was the first to discover the theory of probability"). Daniel Bernoulli was described by W. W. Rouse Ball as "by far the ablest of the younger Bernoullis". He is said to have had a bad relationship with his father. Upon both of them entering and tying for first place in a scientific contest at the University of Paris, his father, unable to bear the "shame" of being compared as Daniel's equal, banned Daniel from his house. His father also plagiarized some key ideas from Daniel's book Hydrodynamica in his own book Hydraulica which he backdated to before Hydrodynamica. Despite Daniel's attempts at reconciliation, his father carried the grudge until his death. He studied medicine at Basel, Heidelberg, and Strasbourg, and earned a PhD in anatomy and botany in 1721.

Daniel was the son of Johann Bernoulli (one of the "early developers" of calculus) and a nephew of Jacob Bernoulli (who "was the first to discover the theory of probability"). Daniel Bernoulli was described by W. W. Rouse Ball as "by far the ablest of the younger Bernoullis". He is said to have had a bad relationship with his father. Upon both of them entering and tying for first place in a scientific contest at the University of Paris, his father, unable to bear the "shame" of being compared as Daniel's equal, banned Daniel from his house. His father also plagiarized some key ideas from Daniel's book Hydrodynamica in his own book Hydraulica which he backdated to before Hydrodynamica. Despite Daniel's attempts at reconciliation, his father carried the grudge until his death. He studied medicine at Basel, Heidelberg, and Strasbourg, and earned a PhD in anatomy and botany in 1721.

He was a contemporary and close friend of Leonhard Euler. He went to St. Petersburg in 1724 as professor of mathematics, and later returned to the University of Basel, where he successively held the chairs of medicine, metaphysics, and natural philosophy until his death.

In May, 1750 he was elected a Fellow of the Royal Society.

Daniel Bernoulli was a Swiss national of Dutch origin. He was born on 8th February 1700 in Groningen, in the Netherlands, into a family of distinguished mathematicians. He was a mathematician and physicist and was one of the many prominent mathematicians in the Bernoulli family. He is particularly remembered for his applications of mathematics to mechanics, especially fluid mechanics, and for his pioneering work in probability and statistics. His name is commemorated in the Bernoulli's principle, a particular example of the conservation of energy, which describes the mathematics of the mechanism underlying the operation of two important technologies of the 20th century: the carburetor and the airplane wing.

Daniel was the son of Johann Bernoulli (one of the "early developers" of calculus) and a nephew of Jacob Bernoulli (who "was the first to discover the theory of probability"). Daniel Bernoulli was described by W. W. Rouse Ball as "by far the ablest of the younger Bernoullis". He is said to have had a bad relationship with his father. Upon both of them entering and tying for first place in a scientific contest at the University of Paris, his father, unable to bear the "shame" of being compared as Daniel's equal, banned Daniel from his house. His father also plagiarized some key ideas from Daniel's book Hydrodynamica in his own book Hydraulica which he backdated to before Hydrodynamica. Despite Daniel's attempts at reconciliation, his father carried the grudge until his death. He studied medicine at Basel, Heidelberg, and Strasbourg, and earned a PhD in anatomy and botany in 1721.

He was a contemporary and close friend of Leonhard Euler. He went to St. Petersburg in 1724 as professor of mathematics, and later returned to the University of Basel, where he successively held the chairs of medicine, metaphysics, and natural philosophy until his death.